Design Options — Closed Version

Design Options

In looking at the current site of the community center and pool, Seattle Parks and Recreation considered five location options for the new building.

The locations outlined with a red square were considered but will not move forward, as they offered too few benefits or created too many impacts on the existing landscape.

The yellow squares show the options under consideration. These design options all provide the same level of recreational amenities and support facilities that are present on site today, including on-site parking for 100 cars, a play area, and basketball courts.

The project team is now considering three different design options for the community center. Scroll down to learn more about each option.

A map showing where five possible designs would be located within the current site.

Legend

 Zone for new building, still being considered

 Considered and ruled out as a zone for the new building

Click image to enlarge.

Option 1: Park Pavilion

The Park Pavilion scheme places the new community center and pool at approximately the same location as the current building. The spaces within the west side of the building would spill out to an outdoor ‘porch’ that faces the lake, the trail, and the swimming beach. The ‘porch’ would allow for great people-watching and sunset views. As planned, the entry at the east side of the building lines up with an existing row of mature sycamore trees, connecting the building to the park and the urban area of the Green Lake neighborhood. The area within the row of trees would be activated by functions such as basketball, a new playground, and an intertwining system of pathways.

This scheme has several environmental benefits, as it maintains the existing access road, parking lot, and drop-off loop, reducing the need for new pavement and preserving many of the historic trees on site.

Opportunities:

  • No change to access road, parking lot, and drop-off loop.
  • Saves many significant trees.

Challenges:

  • The current facility would not be operational during construction.
  • The existing parking lot is close to the lakeshore, taking up a prime spot for other uses.
  • Requires the removal of one ballfield.

Option 2: Lakeside Porch

The Lakeside Porch scheme places the new community center and pool facility north of the current building, approximately where the existing parking lot is. This location would allow the row of sycamore trees to connect the Green Lake ‘urban core’ to the lake shore. The area within the row of trees would be activated by outdoor amenities, including two full-court basketball courts and a picnic pavilion. The pavilion could make use of the existing pool building, or it could be a new structure.

The spaces within the west side of the building would spill out to an outdoor ‘porch’ that faces the lake, the trail, and the swimming beach. The ‘porch’ would allow for great people-watching and sunset views. South-facing spaces would spill out to the area defined by the row of sycamore trees. This scheme moves the access road one block southeast, closer to the crosswalk near the Green Lake Library.

Opportunities:

  • The current facility will be operational during most of construction, although the current parking lot would be closed.
  • Possible re-use of existing pool structure as an open-air pavilion.
  • Relocation of parking lot away from lakeshore.
  • Keeps both ballfields.

Challenges:

  • Relocation of the signaled intersection one block southeast.

Option 3: Neighborhood Connector

The Neighborhood Connector design places the new community center and pool facility at the east edge of the site near the 5-way intersection, where Ravenna Boulevard approaches Green Lake. The pedestrian crosswalk at the 5-way intersection would lead directly to the main entrance of the building. The community center would be part of the Green Lake neighborhood’s ‘urban core’ and serve as a connection from there to the park.

Like Option 2, this scheme also allows the row of sycamore trees to connect the ‘urban core’ to the lakeshore. Because the building and parking are pulled east and away from the lakeshore, more of the west edge of the site is available for outdoor amenities. This building location would restore some of the original Olmsted park design principles, emphasizing landscape spaces rather than buildings.

The playground in this scheme would be a large adventure-type playground and could become a regional destination. There would be two full-court basketball courts as well as a picnic pavilion. This pavilion could make use of the existing pool building, or it could be a new structure. The spaces on the west side of the building would spill out to an outdoor ‘porch’ that faces the park. The large spaces (pool and gym) would be placed along Green Lake Way.

Opportunities:

  • The current facility and parking lot can be operational during construction.
  • Possible re-use of existing pool structure as an open-air pavilion.
  • Relocation of parking lot away from lakeshore.
  • It is likely that the further east the building is placed, the better the soils, which would make the foundation design simpler and more cost-effective.

Challenges:

  • Requires the removal of one ballfield.